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Thread: Wood furniture

  1. #11
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    Aug 2012
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    When choosing furnishings for your restroom or cousin area in your house, you need to search for various choices of wooden furnishings that are available in modern shops. The Internet is an amazing resource for doing such kinds of analysis.

  2. #12
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    Sep 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by slow learner View Post
    Can anyone advise me what are the various type of wood furniture ?
    If you're referring to outdoor furniture, then these are the various wood type your should consider

    Northern White and Western Red Cedars
    Teak
    Eucalpytus
    Native White Oak
    Acacia (Locust)
    China Fir

  3. #13
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    Sep 2012
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    Wooden Furniture are chosen and valued for the character of their grain and color. Hardwoods usually have a richer and finer-textured grain than softwoods, but there are rich grains of all colors and patterns.Modern furniture is very rarely constructed of all wood. Plywood, or engineered wood is used extensively because it provides strength, and helps prevent splitting or warping.

  4. #14
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    Nov 2012
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    What would you say is most durable out of all the wooden furniture listed above? My sister is in the process of furnishing her new house and is planning on staying there for at least the next 30-40 years so she's after some furniture that is hard wearing and won't rot any time soon etc. She's just finished the process of stripping most of the floorboards, adding insulation and then carpets etc and then she's gonna do the walls and then buy her wardrobes, cabinets etc. Does anyone know much about the different types of oak flooring as well? She's chosen to go for oak because of its durability etc but she's currently choosing between engineered and solid. I've heard engineered is less susceptible to temperature changes, but that's all that I know. She's chosen me as resident researcher so I'm just doing some research for her. I know a few builders who have recommended me this place for engineered oak flooring but I can vouch for them as well because I bought some carpet protection from them as well, but just wondered if anyone else had any experience of this site, or the oak flooring?

    Thanks!

  5. #15
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    Aug 2013
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    Great information which you share above about kind of wood furniture which is very useful for everyone, No doubt furniture become important part of every house which increase every house attraction and elegance...




    ____________________
    Brisbane Timber
    Last edited by Jeck0; 7th September 2013 at 05:03 PM.

  6. #16
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    Nov 2014
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    Among all the hardwoods, cherry, maple, mahogany, oak, teak, and walnut are prized for quality furniture.

  7. #17
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    Sep 2014
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    I like the sound of having wood for furniture, but think they will be hard to maintain.

    They do provide a certain ambiance for the house, but thinking about cleaning and polishing..

  8. #18

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    Sampling some softwoods
    Cedar
    The most common type of cedar is the western red variety. Western red cedar, as its name implies, has a reddish color to it. This type of wood is relatively soft (1 on a scale of 1 to 4), has a straight grain, and has a slightly aromatic smell.
    Fir
    Often referred to as Douglas Fir, this wood has a straight, pronounced grain, and has a reddish brown tint to it. Fir is most often used for building; however, it's inexpensive and can be used for some furniture-making as well.
    Pine
    Pine comes in several varieties, including Ponderosa, Sugar, White, and Yellow, and all of them make great furniture. In some areas of the country (especially southwest United States), pine is the wood to use.
    Redwood
    Like cedar, redwood is used mostly for outdoor projects because of its resistance to moisture. Redwood (California redwood) is fairly soft and has a straight grain.
    Homing in on hardwoods
    Ash
    Ash is a white to pale brown wood with a straight grain. It's pretty easy to work with (hardness of 4 on a scale of 1 to 5) and takes stain quite nicely, but ash is getting harder and harder to find.
    Birch
    Birch comes in two varieties: yellow and white. Yellow birch is a pale yellow-to-white wood with reddish-brown heartwood, whereas white birch has a whiter color that resembles maple.
    Cherry
    Cherry is a very popular and all-around great wood; easy to work with, stains and finishes well with just oil, and ages beautifully. Cherry's heartwood has a reddish-brown color to it and the sapwood is almost white.
    Mahogany
    One of the great furniture woods, mahogany (also called Honduran mahogany) has a reddish-brown to deep-red tint, a straight grain, medium texture, and a hardness of around 2 on a scale of 1 to 5. It takes stain very well and looks great with just a coat (or 10) of oil.
    Maple
    Maple comes in two varieties: hard and soft. Both varieties are harder than many other woods; hard maple is so hard (a 5 on a scale of 1 to 5) that it's difficult to work with. Soft maple, on the other hand, is relatively easy to work with.
    Oak
    Oak is one of the most used woods for furniture. Available in two varieties — red and white — oak is strong (hardness of about 4 on a scale of 1 to 5) and easy to work with.
    Poplar
    Poplar is one of the less expensive hardwoods. It's also fairly soft (1 in hardness on a scale of 1 to 5), which makes it easy to work with. Poplar is white with some green or brown streaks in the heartwood.
    Teak
    Teak is becoming rarer as the days go on, but it is the staple for fine outdoor furniture. Teak is highly weather-resistant and beautiful (not to mention expensive — can you believe almost $24 a board foot?).
    Walnut
    With a hardness of about 4 on a 1 to 5 scale, walnut is a rich brown wood that's easy to work with. Unfortunately, walnut is somewhat expensive (usually around $8 a board foot), and finding large boards for big projects is getting difficult.
    Last edited by carmenjames; 18th March 2015 at 04:41 AM.

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